Experts and hearsay rules: cross versus direct   
Review the basics involving hearsay and experts. The key points: (1) The rules are different on direct vs. cross; and (2) the rules on direct have changed in a big way.
Social media evidence: admissibility issues   
Proponents seeking to admit social media evidence will face three primary hurdles of admissibility: relevance, authentication and hearsay.
The Marital Privilege   
Attorneys need to know the subtleties of this vital evidentiary rule
Email at Trial   
Electronic communications pose intricate evidentiary issues in the courtroom.
Objections to the form of questions   
Learn about objections to questions considered vague, ambiguous or unintelligible, compound, argumentative, and asked and answered, or which suffer from other infirmities
Bruton in a post-Crawford world   
Acquaint yourself with limits to admission of a defendant's statements in multiple defendant trials, and to explore redaction as a way to permit statements to be admitted in a joint trial.
Authenticating Web Evidence   
Authenticating Internet evidence requires care and attention to detail.
Objections to the form of questions   
Learn about objections to questions considered vague, ambiguous or unintelligible, compound, argumentative, and asked and answered, or which suffer from other infirmities.
A primer on hearsay evidence   
The objective of this article and accompanying self-study test is for readers to be able to determine the admissibility of statements under the hearsay rule.
'Other acts' in sexual assault cases   
The objective of this article and self-study test is to acquaint bench officers and attorneys with other acts evidence in sexual assault cases.
Hearsay exceptions for children in sexual assault cases   
The objective of this article and self-study test is to familiarize bench officers and attorneys with hearsay exceptions for children in sexual assault cases, including admission of statements to prove the corpus delicti, statements made for medical
Crawford update: Part Two   
The objective of this article and accompanying self-study test is to provide readers with the latest developments concerning Crawford v. Washington, 541 U.S. 36 (2004), and the Sixth Amendment’s right to confrontation as applied to forensic analysis
Crawford update: Part One   
The objective of this article and accompanying self-study test is to provide readers with a review of the Crawford opinion and to discuss the latest developments in the field of confrontation of witnesses under Crawford.
Document Summaries In Court   
When a case involves millions of documents, litigators often resort to summaries to make their presentation feasible. But is a summary admissible?
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